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Geoweb Data Catalogue

Layers

Land Use

Urban Settlement

Built-up Area (2006)

The Built Boundary differs from the Urban Area. The Built Boundary is the outer edge of the “built-up area” as of June 2006 as defined by the Province of Ontario in 2008 for the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. It encloses lands that were developed for urban uses (such as residential or employment) when the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe came into effect in June 2006. The Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure Renewal defined the Built Boundary for each municipality in consultation with upper- and single-tier municipalities. For the purposes of the Growth Plan, all development inside the Built Boundary after 2006 is considered intensification; outside the Built Boundary, development is considered to be greenfield development.

In distinguishing between urban settlements (shown using grey for existing development and dark pink for areas where future development may take place) and Settlement Without Undelineated Built-Up Area (shown in brown as spatial areas and points), the Geoweb follows the distinction made by the Province of Ontario: settlements with a Built Boundary are urban; those without are Settlement Without Delineated Built-Up Area.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Settlement Without Delineated Built-Up Area (Point)

Settlement areas identified by the Province of Ontario which do not have a delineated built-up area. They are mainly of villages and hamlets served completely or partially by septic tanks (rather than sewers) and wells (rather than watermains). These communities are not intended to be a focus of growth or intensification; however, in a few cases, lands have been added or proposed for expansion to a village or hamlet since the Growth Plan came into effect in 2006; these areas are distinguished on the Geoweb as "Settlement without Delienated Built-up Area (Expansion Post-2006).” 

Mapping Source:

Settlement without Delineated Built-up Area and Settlement without Delineated Built-up Area (Expansion Post-2006)

Settlement consists mainly of villages and hamlets served completely or partially by septic tanks (rather than sewers) and wells (rather than watermains). These communities are not intended to be a focus of growth or intensification; however, in a few cases, lands have been added or proposed for expansion to a village or hamlet since the Growth Plan came into effect in 2006; these areas are distinguished on the Geoweb as “Rural Settlement (post 2006).” The spatial boundary is derived from municipal officials plans based on points identified by the Province of Ontario in 2008 as part of its "Methodology to Define the Built Boundary for the Greater Golden Horseshoe."

Mapping Sources: 

The Neptis Foundation identified and mapped rural settlements and rural expansion areas through a review of municipal Official Plans, Official Plan Amendments, and other planning documents before and after the introduction of the Growth Plan conformity amendments.

Additional Information:

Designated Greenfield Area (2006-2031)

This layer consists of lands within a municipality currently designated for development in an Official Plan; they were designated either before or after the Growth Plan came into effect in 2006. The layer titled "Historical Designated Greenfield Area (Prior to 2006)" is land that was designated for urbanization before the Growth Plan was established in 2006. These lands were included in the Growth Plan as Designated Greenfield Areas. They are located outside the Built Boundary, but inside the Settlement Area Boundary of each municipality. Urban Expansion Areas are intended to accommodate greenfield development up to 2031. Density targets specified in the Growth Plan apply to the way development in this geographic area as measured across an upper- or single-tier municipality.

Each municipality has calculated its own greenfield area land requirements, but as of 2013, the Province had not published overall totals for designated greenfield areas or settlement boundary expansions for the region as a whole. The Neptis Foundation therefore conducted its own research to determine the cumulative total for these numbers across the GGH. This research formed the basis of the Urban Expansion Area layer.

Within the lands designated for future development, certain areas have been set aside as open space, environmentally protected areas, or greenlands (different official plans categorize them in different ways). These lands can be identified on the Geoweb by adding the “Greenlands” layer (see below for description) over the Urban Expansion Area layer.

Mapping Source:

The Neptis Foundation identified and mapped these areas through a review of municipal Official Plans, Official Plan Amendments, and other planning documents before and after the introduction of the Growth Plan conformity amendments. Neptis continues to monitor new and amended Official Plans and will update the Geoweb as necessary.

Additional Information:

Barrie Annexation Land

The Barrie-Innisfil Boundary Adjustment Act, 2009 (Bill 196), extended the southern boundary of Barrie to include 2,335 hectares (5,700 acres) of land previously in the Town of Innisfil, effective January 1, 2010. In 2014, the city of Barrie approved two separate secondary plans for the western section (Salem) and the eastern section (Hewitt’s).

Mapping Source:

Brantford/Brant Boundary Adjustment

The County of Brant transferred 2,454 hectares (6,060 acres) to the City of Brantford through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by the mayors of the City of Brantford and the County of Brant on January 6, 2016. The MOU and proposal have been submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing for approval.

Mapping Source:

Amendment 1 Employment Areas in Simcoe County (Until 2031)

The four Strategic Employment Lands in Simcoe County were designated for employment uses through an amendment to the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, approved in January 2012 (Amendment 1: Simcoe Sub Area to the Growth Plan).

Mapping Sources: 

Neptis mapped the Bradford-West Gwillimbury Strategic Settlement Employment Area (740 ha/1,830 acres), the Innisfil Heights Strategic Settlement Employment Area (410 ha/1,015 acres), the Lake Simcoe Regional Airport Economic Employment District (350 ha/865 acres), and the Rama Road Economic Employment District (360 ha/890 acres), using the following information from the Ministry of Infrastructure:

1.     Bradford West Gwillimbury Strategic Settlement Employment Area. Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, 2012: https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=348&Itemid=14

2.     Innisfil Heights Strategic Settlement Employment Area, Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, 2012: https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=387&Itemid=14

3.     Lake Simcoe Regional Airport Economic Employment District, Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, 2012: https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=349&Itemid=14

4.     Rama Road Economic Employment District, Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, 2012: https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=350&Itemid=14

Additional Information:

Employment Lands

Lands classified according to six employment land-use designations (Industrial/General Employment, Major Commercial, Institutional, Business Office/Mixed Use Employment, Rural Industrial, Airport); excludes downtowns, core areas, exclusively mixed-use areas, and aggregate/extractive areas.

Mapping Source:

  • This data set was shared by the Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing through the Ontario Geospatial Data Exchange in 2015. The data set helped to inform the analysis in the Neptis report, Planning for Prosperity: Globalization, Competitiveness, and the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. It was created through the identification and digitization of areas of employment uses inside and outside designated Employment Areas in municipal official plans. The data set is considered a preliminary assessment of the current supply of employment lands in the GGH, but requires further work to ensure the most up-to-date status and delineation of employment lands.

Friday Harbour (Big Bay Point)

Lands within the Big Bay Point Resort Secondary Plan area (also known as Friday Harbour) are designated as Resort Recreational and are subject to policies contained in Official Plan Amendment 17 to the Innisfil Official Plan.

Mapping Source:

Pickering Airport Lands (Federal)

The Federal Airport Lands originally consisted of 7,350 hectares (18,200 acres) in the municipalities of Pickering, Markham, and Uxbridge (Durham Region) that were expropriated by the Government of Canada in 1972 and reserved for the site of an international airport that was never built. The lands are the subject of ongoing federal government studies. On April 1, 2015, Transport Canada transferred about 1,900 hectares (4,700 acres) of the federal lands to Parks Canada, the first tract of land to become part of the Rouge National Urban Park. On July 11, 2015, the federal government agreed to transfer a further 2,100 hectares (5,200 acres) in Pickering and Uxbridge to the Park.

Mapping Source:

Urban Growth Centres

The Growth Plan identifies 25 existing or emerging Urban Growth Centres within municipalities across the region and sets density targets for each one: these historic downtowns and emerging suburban centres are expected to achieve a density of between 150 and 400 people and jobs per hectare by 2031, depending on their location, context, and growth potential. Seventeen of the Urban Growth Centres are in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (Inner Ring). Of the eight in the Outer Ring, four are in the Waterloo and Niagara Regions. The size and location of each Urban Growth Centre are defined in municipal planning documents.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

 Apartment Towers

The Apartment Towers data layer shows the location of concrete frame residential buildings that are eight storeys or more, built between 1945 and 1984. This data comes from the Tower Neighbourhood Renewal in the Greater Golden Horseshoe project. The objective of the project was to analyze and catalogue apartment towers, and examine the potential for these types of buildings to help achieve the goals recent provincial policies that support smart growth.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Urban Area (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011)

Urban Areas comprise all lands that have been developed for urban uses – residential, employment, commercial, etc. The 1991, 2001, and 2011 urban area layers are derived from satellite data and were created by the Neptis Foundation. The 2011 layer is currently available only for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), and not for the Outer Ring.

Landsat satellite imagery and remote sensing techniques were used to delineate the extent of the built-up urban area for the Greater Golden Horseshoe for 1991, 2001, and 2011. Earlier years – 1971 and 1981 – were mapped by the Canada Land Use Monitoring Program (CLUMP), established in 1978 by the Lands Directorate of Environment Canada.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

 

Agriculture & Environment

Greenbelt

The Greenbelt consists of 1,134,209 hectares (approximately 2 million acres) of farmland, rural communities, forests, wetlands, quarries, lakes, and rivers that are permanently protected from certain kinds of development under provincial legislation. The Greenbelt Plan includes lands previously protected by the Niagara Escarpment Plan and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan. It also encompasses the Protected Countryside and Urban River Valley system established by the Greenbelt Plan. The information layer indicates the extent of the Greenbelt Area as defined by Ontario Regulation 59/05, under the Greenbelt Act, 2005 that was updated under the Greenbelt Plan, 2017.

Mapping Source:

 Additional Information:

Greenbelt Components

Niagara Escarpment Plan

The Niagara Escarpment is a ridge of limestone stretching 750 km (470 miles) from the Niagara River in the south to Georgian Bay in the north. Because of its diverse ecosystems and unique geology, the Escarpment is recognized by UNESCO as a World Biosphere Reserve. The Niagara Escarpment Plan contains measures to balance protection, conservation, and sustainable development of the area. The Plan identifies six land use designations (Natural, Protection, Rural, Recreation, Urban, and Mineral Resource Extraction) and contains policies appropriate to each one.

Mapping Source:

  • The information layer indicates the extent of the Niagara Escarpment as defined in the Niagara Escarpment Plan, as provided by the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act, 1990. Niagara Escarpment Plan Maps are available from the Niagara Escarpment Commission: http://www.escarpment.org/landplanning/planmaps/index.php

Additional Information:

Oak Ridges Moraine

The Oak Ridges Moraine is a ridge of sandy hills covering 190,000 hectares (470,000 acres) and stretching 160 km (100 miles) from the Niagara Escarpment in the west to the Trent River in the east. The Moraine includes sensitive environmental, geological, and hydrological features. The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan divides the moraine into six land use designations (Natural Core Area, Natural Linkage Area, Countryside Area, Settlement Area, Rural Settlement Area, and Palgrave Estates Residential Community) and specifies land use and resource management policies for each one.

Mapping Source:

The information layer indicates the extent of the Oak Ridges Moraine as defined by the Plan Boundary of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area (Ontario Regulation 01/02), under the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001.

Additional Information:

Protected Countryside

Under the Greenbelt Plan, the Protected Countryside category consists of agricultural, settlement, and natural heritage system not otherwise protected under the Niagara Escarpment Plan or the Oak Ridges Moraine Plan. This designation protects the natural heritage and water resource systems in these areas, as well as the character of rural communities. The Protected Countryside designation includes Specialty Crop Areas, Prime Agricultural Lands, and Rural Lands, and provides for different levels of protection against loss and fragmentation of these agricultural lands. After the 2017 consolidated review, four areas, two within the City of Hamilton and two within the Regional Municipality of Niagara, totaling approximately 5,800 acres were added to the Protected Countryside area.

Mapping Source:

  • The information layer indicates the extent of the Protected Countryside as defined by the Plan Boundary of the Protected Countryside (Ontario Regulation 59/05), under the Greenbelt Act, 2005: http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page191.aspx

Additional Information:

Urban River Valley

Under the Greenbelt Plan, 2017 which came into effect July 1, 2017, the Urban River Valley category consists of river valleys conecting the rest of the Greenbelt Plan area to inland lakes and the Great Lakes. This designation protects natural heritage and hydrologic features and functions along the Urban River Valleys such as wetlands, as well as lands designated within official plans for uses such as conservation, open space, parks, environmental protection and recreation. The Urban River Valley category includes the Glenorchy Lands that were approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council, Order-in-Council No. 110/2013 January 9, 2013 (effective January 10, 2013) under Greenbelt Plan Amendment No.1

Mapping Source:

  • The information layer indicates the extent of the Urban River Valley area as defined by the Plan Boundary of the Urban River Valley (Ontario Regulation 59/05), under the Greenbelt Act, 2005: http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page191.aspx

Additional Information:

 

Protected Countryside Natural Heritage System

The Natural System provides a continuous and permanent land base necessary to support human and ecological health in the Greenbelt and beyond. The Natural System policies protect areas of natural heritage, hydrologic and/or landform features, which are often functionally inter-related and collectively support biodiversity and overall ecological integrity.

Mapping Source:

·       Greenbelt Plan, 2005, Schedule 4: http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=12345

Lake Simcoe Protection Plan Area

The Lake Simcoe Protection Plan was established in 2009 for Lake Simcoe and its surrounding watersheds (which include portions of 23 municipalities) to improve the water quality of the lake and protect it from further degradation. The Plan includes requirements to manage phosphorus, conduct stormwater master planning, restrict the use of live bait, and establish clear shoreline protection zones.

Mapping Source:

The information layer indicates the extent of the Lake Simcoe Protection Act Watershed Boundary as defined in Ontario Regulation 219/09, under the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan, 2008.

Additional Information:

Greenlands

This data set is an aggregation of natural heritage features collected from municipal, provincial, and federal sources in 2004. The data include significant wetlands, significant coastal wetlands, fish habitat, significant woodlands, significant valleylands, significant habitat of endangered species and threatened species, significant wildlife habitat, and significant areas of natural and scientific interest.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Agricultural Land

Prime Agricultural Land

Prime Agricultural Land consists of agricultural areas with Class 1, 2, or 3 soils, as identified in the Canada Land Inventory. These lands represent some of the best soils in the region for agricultural production.

Mapping Source:

Niagara Tender Fruit Lands

The Niagara Tender Fruit Lands are characterized by fertile soils and microclimates that provide ideal conditions for growing wine grapes and other soft fruits.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Holland Marsh

The Holland Marsh is a wetland and agricultural area along the valley of the Holland River, north of the Oak Ridges Moraine and south of Lake Simcoe. The fertile soil is ideal for growing market garden crops (mainly vegetables).

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Additional Information:

Duffins Rouge Agricultural Preserve

The Duffins Rouge Agricultural Preserve, established in 2005, includes about 1,900 hectares (4,700 acres) of prime agricultural lands in west Pickering. The preserve was once part of a larger area expropriated by the federal government in the 1970s for the Pickering airport (see entry on Pickering Airport Lands for more information).

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Unprotected Countryside

Unprotected Countryside (the so-called “Whitebelt”) consists of lands between the outer edge of the urban settlement areas (that is, Built-up Area, 2006, and Urban Expansion Area) within the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area and the inner edge of the Greenbelt. This area is known informally as the “Whitebelt” because it is shown as white on Growth Plan maps. These lands have no status in the Growth Plan and are neither protected from development nor designated for future urban development.

Mapping Source:

The Neptis Foundation identified and mapped the “Whitebelt” through a review of municipal Official Plans, Official Plan Amendments, and other planning documents published before and after the introduction of the Growth Plan conformity amendments.

Additional Information:

Pits & Quarries

Pits and quarries are active sites for mining stone, sand, and gravel and contain all of the licensed and permitted sites under the Aggregate Resources Act of Ontario that are regulated by the Ministry of Natural Resources. Last update 2006.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Rouge National Urban Park

Canada’s first national urban park will cover 7,910 hectares in Toronto, Durham, and York. The Park preserves a rare Carolinian forest, historic and archaeological sites, significant geological landforms, hundreds of species of plants and animals, and tracts of farmland.

Mapping Source:

Rivers

Rivers consist of watercourses in Southern Ontario, including creeks and streams. The rivers are represented as either main rivers or tributaries.

Mapping Source:

The rivers data set was created from the National Hydro Network (NHN) by the University of Toronto GIS and Cartography Office for their Base Series for Southwestern Ontario. This map layer contains a selection of the original data, which has been generalized for cartographic purposes.

Additional Information:

  • Description of National Hydro Network (NHN) product metadata:

http://www.geobase.ca/geobase/en/data/nhn/index.html

Conservation Authorities

The Conservation Authorities of Ontario are local watershed management agencies that offer programs and services related to the protection of natural resources. The Conservation Authorities included in the Geoweb are those which fall inside the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH).

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Watersheds

A watershed, also known as a catchment basin or catchment area, includes all of the land that is drained by a watercourse and its tributaries.

Mapping Source:

Watershed Health (Within Greenbelt)

The portions of watersheds that fall within the Oak Ridges Moraine and adjacent Greenbelt lands have been monitored using standardized metrics to assess forest health, surface water quality, groundwater quality, and stream temperature (only the information on forest health and surface water quality is available on the Geoweb at present).

Mapping Source:

Oak Ridges Moraine and Greenbelt Report Card Report – Subwatershed boundaries and respective health scores are provided by the Conservation Authorities Moraine Coalition (CAMC), which represents nine conservation authorities across the Oak Ridges Moraine. The boundaries for the watersheds include only the sections that fall within the Greenbelt area.

Additional Information:

Transportation

GO Rail: Existing Lines and Stations

GO Transit was created by the Province of Ontario in 1967, and provides inter-regional public transit service for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. It was merged with Metrolinx in 2009. The GO network deploys diesel trains and coach buses, and connects with the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) and Via Rail systems. This map layer includes both active rail stations and rail lines and future rail stations and rail lines proposed by Metrolinx in the 2008 plan known as The Big Move and its updates.

Mapping Sources:

      Additional Information:

GO Rail: Lines and Stations Under Construction

An extension of the Richmond Hill line from the Gormley station to Bloomington is under construction.

Mapping source:

GO Rail: Electrification and Regional Express Rail

Metrolinx plans to convert the rail lines that it owns to electric power (currently, GO Rail runs diesel trains). Since some GO trains use rail lines that are not in Metrolinx ownership, not all of the current GO Rail network will be converted. Electrification will allow for more frequent all-day service of 15 minutes frequency or less. The project is expected to be complete in 2024.

Mapping Sources:

Additional Information:

 

GO Rail Enhancements not part of RER network

In three of the electrified corridors (Barrie, Kitchener, and Stouffville), RER-type services will not operate the full length of the line. On the Barrie line, RER service will operate between Union Station and Aurora; GO Rail service between Union Station and Barrie will be upgraded. On the Kitchener line, RER service will operate between Union Station and Bramalea; GO Rail service between Union Station and Kitchener will be upgraded. On the Stouffville line, RER service will operate between Union Station and Unionville; GO Rail service between Union Station and Lincolnville will be upgraded.

Mapping source:

GO Rail: Proposed Lines and Stations

Three extensions of GO Rail lines have been the subject of Environmental Assessments, but are not yet approved for construction. One is an extension of the Richmond Hill line to Bloomington, a second is the extension of the Lakeshore East line to Bowmanville, and the third is the extension of the Lakeshore West line to Centennial Parkway in Hamilton/Stoney Creek (Confederation Station).

 

Mapping source:

SmartTrack (ST)

The SmartTrack proposal was introduced during the 2014 City of Toronto mayoral campaign. SmartTrack is a rapid transit system that would use existing GO rail corridors of the Lakeshore East line, the Stouffville line, and the Kitchener line; a proposed extension connecting Mt. Dennis station on the Kitchener line to the Airport Corporate Centre in Mississauga is also under consideration. The system would offer more frequent service and aims to connect major employment areas. New stations would be added to the lines.

In early 2016, the City of Toronto and the Province of Ontario, through its agency Metrolinx, reviewed ways to integrate SmartTrack with GO RER and developed four options for further study.

Mapping Sources:

 Additional Information:

 

Subway Lines

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) has three subway lines, most of which operate underground: the Yonge-University-Spadina line, the Bloor-Danforth line, and the Sheppard line. Scarborough Rapid Transit (RT) is included in this data set, even though it does not operate the same technology or vehicles, and passengers must transfer from the Bloor-Danforth line onto separate cars.

Mapping Source:

Subway Stations

The three subway lines and the Scarborough RT line include 69 stations, five of which are transfer stations between lines.

Mapping Source:

Subway Lines and Stations: Under Construction

Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension (TYSSE)

The Toronto York-Spadina subway extension to Vaughan in York Region is currently under construction and is scheduled to begin operation in 2017.

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Additional Information:

Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension Stations

The York-Spadina subway extension to Vaughan will include six new stations (Downsview Park, Finch West, York University, Pioneer Village, Highway 407, and Vaughan Metropolitan Centre

Mapping Source:

Subway Lines and Stations: Proposed

Extension of the Bloor-Danforth Line to Scarborough Centre

As of January 2016, the TTC and the City of Toronto had arrived at a “Proposed Solution” for the route of the Scarborough Subway. It extends from the Kennedy terminus of the Bloor-Danforth (No. 2) line along McCowan Road to the Scarborough Centre.

Mapping Source:

    Downtown Relief Line: Preferred Route (Proposed)

Proposed alignment for a subway line linking the Bloor-Danforth (No. 2) subway line at Pape Station to downtown Toronto and City Hall.

    Downtown Relief Line: Preferred Route Stations (Proposed)

Proposed stations for a subway line linking the Bloor-Danforth (No. 2) subway line at Pape Station to downtown Toronto and City Hall.

 

     Yonge Subway extension to Richmond Hill

Proposed alignment for a 6.8-km extension of the Yonge Subway line from Finch Station to the Richmond Hill Centre Terminal. The Transit Project Assessment Process was approved by the Province in April 2009 and the Conceptual Design Study was approved by the Toronto Transit Commission and the Regional Municipality of York in 2012.

Mapping Sources:

 Proposed Yonge Subway Extension Stations

The Yonge Subway Extension would include five new stations: Cummer, Steeles, Clark, Langstaff, and Richmond Hill Centre.

 

Mapping Source:

 

 

    Union Pearson Express Line

Union Pearson Express (UP Express), a division of Metrolinx, is a dedicated airport express train that links the downtown core of Toronto with Pearson Airport in Mississauga. Trains between Union Station and Pearson International Airport depart every 15 minutes during the day and make the trip in 25 minutes.

Mapping Sources:

  • The Neptis Foundation identified and mapped the Union Pearson Express using data from the Union Pearson Express website: https://www.upexpress.com/SchedulesStations/OurStations
  • Satellite imagery was also used to map the Union Pearson Express route, as the airport spur (final section connecting to the airport) is visible in recent image updates.

Additional Information:

Union Pearson Express Stations

There are four stations along the Union Pearson Express line: Union, Bloor, Weston, and Pearson Airport. The locations of the first three coincide with existing GO Stations, and the final terminus was constructed at Terminal 1 at Pearson International Airport.

Mapping Source:

 

 

Light Rail Transit (LRT): Under Construction

Light Rail Transit (LRT) systems include both the lines currently under construction, as well as those proposed. The Neptis Foundation identified and mapped the Eglinton Crosstown, the Finch West, the Scarborough LRT, and the Sheppard East lines using plans available on the TTC and Metrolinx websites. The Kitchener/Waterloo, Hurontario-Main, and Hamilton B-Line LRTs were identified and mapped using plans available from their respective agencies as well.

Eglinton Crosstown

The Eglinton Crosstown is a 19-kilometre (12-mile) light rail transit (LRT) line that will run along the route of Eglinton Avenue; 10 km of the central part of the line will be underground. The project is expected to be complete in 2021 and is intended to facilitate east-west travel in Toronto. Stations for the Eglinton Crosstown are also included.

Mapping Sources:

Waterloo ION

The Region of Waterloo’s ION LRT will run between Conestoga Mall in the City of Waterloo and Fairview Park Mall in the City of Kitchener (19 km/12 miles).

Mapping Source:

·       Waterloo ION: http://rapidtransit.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/projectinformation/system.asp

·       Construction updates: https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=z-_w7PO-jnj8.kYhOeuiWDVDk

 

Light Rail Transit (LRT): Planned

Finch West Line

Finch West is an 11-kilometre (7-mile) LRT line from the new Finch West subway station (on the York-Spadina extension to Vaughan) along Finch Avenue to Humber College at Highway 427. Construction is estimated to begin in 2017.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

 

Finch West LRT Stations (Planned)

There are 18 planned stations along the Finch West LRT line which runs between the Humber College and Keele Street.

Mapping Source:

 

Mississauga Hurontario LRT

Mississauga and Brampton’s proposed Hurontario-Main LRT is planned to run from Port Credit GO station in the south along Hurontario Street to Shoppers World as the north terminus at Steeles Avenue.

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Hurontario LRT Stations (Planned)

There are 22 planned stations along the Hurontario LRT line which runs between the Port Credit GO Station and Steeles Avenue West.

Mapping Source:

 

Hamilton B-Line

Hamilton’s B-Line LRT will eventually run from McMaster University in the west of Hamilton, to East Gate Mall in the east. Construction is expected to start in 2019.

Mapping Sources:

 

   Hamilton B-Line LRT Stations (Planned)

There are 17 planned stations along the Hamilton B-Line LRT which between McMaster and Eastgate.

Mapping Source:

 

Light Rail Transit (LRT): Proposed 

    Sheppard East

Sheppard East is a planned 13-kilometre (8-mile) LRT line running from Don Mills subway station to east of Morningside Avenue. Although construction was originally intended to start in 2017 for completion in 2021, its construction has been postponed, and a new date has not yet been announced. We have therefore classified it as a "proposed" line.

Additional Information:

 

 

Sheppard East LRT Stations (Proposed)

These are the four key stations proposed for the Sheppard East LRT line between Don Mills and Morningside.

Mapping Source:

 

Eglinton Crosstown Western Extension

In January 2016, a study of several proposals to link the SmartTrack with Pearson International Airport found that the reference case – and extension of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT – was the preferred route.

Mapping Source:

 

Eglinton Crosstown West LRT to Airport Stations (Proposed)

The sixteen stations proposed for the Eglinton Crosstown West LRT to Pearson Airport were identified in a presentation to the the Metrolinx Board on February 10, 2016. The line and stations are also identified in the draft 2041 Regional Transportation Plan released in September, 2017 as being under development. The proposed line is an extension of the of the Eglinton Crosstown, a 19-kilometre (12-mile) light rail transit (LRT) line, currently under construction that is intended to facilitate east-west travel in Toronto. 

Mapping Source:

 

Eglinton Crosstown East Corridor

In January 2016, City of Toronto staff proposed the extension of the Eglinton Crosstown in the East to connect to University of Toronto, Scarborough Campus as part of updated transit planning in Scarborough.

Mapping Source:

Waterfront LRT

The City of Toronto is currently studying proposals for an LRT line along the Waterfront.

Mapping Source:

Jane Street LRT

Maps of future transit lines in Toronto include an LRT line running up Jane Street from Bloor Street to Steeles Avenue.

 

Streetcar service in Toronto

Most streetcars in Toronto operate in mixed traffic; a few have separated rights of way for all or part of their route. 

Mapping sources:

Mobility Hubs

Mobility hubs are made up of transit stations and the area surrounding them. Identified by the Regional Transportation Plan for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, mobility hubs connect different modes of transportation and serve as the origin, destination, or transfer point of trips.

Mapping source:

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Bus rapid transit consists of buses running along a dedicated right-of-way. In the GGH, bus rapid transit systems operate or are planned for in Brampton (Züm), Durham (DRT Pulse), Mississauga (Transitway), Toronto (York University Busway), Waterloo (ION BRT) and York (VIVA). We have only included BRT in dedicated right-of-ways on the Geoweb.

Mapping Sources:

York Viva Rapidways

Mississauga Transitway

An 18-kilometre BRT line with 12 stations due for completion in 2017; portions of the route are now in service.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT): Under Construction

York Region: Viva 7 Rapidways (under construction)

Mississauga: Extensions to Transitway (under construction)

 

 

    Bus Rapid Transit: Proposed

Maps of future Toronto transit networks include provision for additional BRT lines.

Steeles Avenue BRT line (proposed)

A proposed line from York University to Milliken GO station along Steeles Avenue, shown in a February 2016 presentation on future Toronto transit.

 

Railways

Railways include all railway lines in Southern Ontario.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Roads

Roads include expressways, highways, and major arterial roads in Southern Ontario.

Mapping Source:

Additional Information:

Highways

Highway 407 ETR Extension (Under Construction)

Highway 7 from Guelph to Kitchener (Under Construction)

Highway 412 (Under Construction)

Highway 407 East Extension (Planned)

Highway 418 Toll Route (Planned)

Highway 427 Extension (Planned)

Bradford Bypass, also known as 400–404 Link (Proposed)

Highway 404 Extension (Proposed)

Proposed GTA West corridor

The Ministry of Transportation’s GTA West Transportation Corridor Planning and Environmental Assessment Study is intended to study routes for a new 400-series highway and a transitway, as well as ways to facilitate the movement of goods in the region.

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Intermodal Terminals

These facilities allow the transfer of freight from train to truck or vice versa. Since the publication of the Growth Plan, which showed six intermodal terminals, a number of changes have taken place, which are reflected in the Geoweb.

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Major Ports

The Greater Golden Horseshoe has two major lake ports on Lake Ontario (Toronto and Hamilton), and one on Lake Erie (Port Colborne).

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Welland Canal

The Welland Canal is a ship canal linking Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. As part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, this 42-km (26-mile) canal enables ships to bypass Niagara Falls.

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Major Airports

The Greater Golden Horseshoe contains four major airports: Toronto Pearson International Airport, Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport, and the Region of Waterloo International Airport. All four serve domestic and international destinations. Small airfields and heliports are not mapped.

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Patterns


 

Demographics

Population (2016)

The distribution of residents was mapped by dissemination areas from the Statistics Canada 2016 Census of Population.

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Population Change (2011-2016)

The change in population between 2011 and 2016 was mapped by dissemination area for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, using data from the 2016 Census of Population and clipped to the 2016 urbanized area.

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Population Density (2016)

The population density in 2016 calculated by dividing the total population in each dissemination area by the area (hectares) of each dissemination area. Population (2016) was obtained from Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population, and the area of dissemination areas were calculated by Neptis.

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Age Generational Breakdown (2016)

The distribution of residents based on their generation was mapped by dissemination areas from the Statistics Canada 2016 Census of Population.

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Immigration Status (2016)

The distribution of non-immigrants, immigrants, and non-permanent residents was mapped by dissemination areas from the Statistics Canada 2016 Census of Population.

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Educational Attainment (2016)

The distribution of persons with various levels of educational attainment, such as the highest certificate, diploma or degree attained, was mapped by dissemination areas from the Statistics Canada 2016 Census of Population.

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Housing

Median Household Income (2016)

The distribution of median total household incomes of dissemination areas. Median household income refers to the income of all household members before income taxes and other deductions in 2015.

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Median Value of Dwellings (2016)

The distribution of private dwelling values (median) in 2016 if the asset were to be sold (estimated by owner).

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Households spending 30% or more on Shelter Costs (2016)

The shelter-cost-to-income ratio which refers to the proportion of average total income of household which is spent on shelter costs.

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Structural Type of Dwellings (2016)

Structural characteristics and/or dwelling configuration, that is, whether the dwelling is a single-detached house, an apartment in a high-rise building, a row house or a mobile home.

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Languages

Aboriginal Languages (2016)

The distribution of persons speaking aboriginal languages (mother tongue).

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French (2016)

The distribution of persons speaking French (mother tongue).

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Immigrant Languages (2016)

The distribution of persons speaking immigrant languages (mother tongue).

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Labour

Labour Force Status (2016)

The distribution of persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2016, were either employed or unemployed.

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Employment Rate (2016)

Persons, 15 years of age and over, employed in a week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Expressed as a percentage of the total population.

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Economy

Core Employment (2016)

The dot density map was generated by layering dots representing 100 core jobs in a census tract or a census subdivision; core jobs are jobs in the “tradeable” sectors that draw income into the region and are key to innovation and competitiveness. They are distinct from population-related jobs that serve only the local residents of an area. The data include only those jobs with a fixed place of work. Data from the 2016 Census of Population, place of work universe.

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  • Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population: Custom order

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Core Employment Change (2006–2016)

The addition or loss of core jobs was mapped by census tracts or a census subdivision: core jobs are jobs in the “tradeable” sectors that draw income into the region and are key to innovation and competitiveness. They are distinct from population-related jobs that serve only the local residents of an area. Only jobs with a usual place of work are included. Data from the 2006 and 2016 Census of Population, place of work universe.

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  • Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population: Custom order
  • Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population: Custom order

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Population-Related Employment (2016)

The dot density map was generated by layering dots representing 100 population-related jobs in a census tract or census subdivision; these are jobs serving the local population in shops, schools, restaurants, etc. The data include only those jobs with a fixed place of work. Data from the 2016 Census of Population, place of work universe.

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  • Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population: Custom order

 

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    Population-Related Employment Change (2006–2016)

Gain and loss of jobs in activities serving the local population in a census tract or a census subdivision; these are jobs serving the local population in shops, schools, restaurants, etc. The data include only those jobs with a fixed place of work. Data from the 2006 and 2016 Census of Population, place of work universe.

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  • Statistics Canada, 2016 Census of Population: Custom order
  • Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population: Custom order

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Industry Clusters (2016)

Industry Clusters demonstrate the distribution of eight significant industries in the Greater Golden Horseshoe region. The data represented in this section are from the 'industry' section of the 2016 Census of Population. Industry clusters include:

  • Life Sciences
  • Food and Beverages
  • Technology
  • Finance and Insurance
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Automotive Manufacturing
  • Creative Industries
  • Business Services

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Travel

Travel Modes (2016)

The main mode of transportation a person uses to travel between his or her home and his or her place of work. Modes of transportation include walk, bicycle, public transit, drive, and other methods.

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Morning commuting trips to major employment areas (2011)

AM peak-hour work trips in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (see mapping source for exact geography) to the major employment destinations in the Greater Golden Horseshoe: downtown Toronto, the employment megazone around Pearson Airport, and in Vaughan/Toronto and Markham/Toronto area, and Suburban Knowledge-Intensive Districts in Markham, Mississauga (Airport, Meadowvale, Sheridan), and Waterloo.

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